Increasing your self-motivation

Introduction

Self-motivation is important for anyone who wants to reach their goals and be successful in life, but it is especially important for people who work in business.

As a manager, leader, or team member, being able to keep yourself motivated can have a direct effect on the success of a project or the company as a whole.

In this article, we’ll talk about how important self-motivation is in the business world and give you some tips on how to motivate yourself more.

What is self-motivation?

Self-motivation is the driving force behind achieving our goals and pushing ourselves to be our best selves. It is the internal drive that keeps us going when things get tough and helps us stay focused on what we want to accomplish.

Reasons for increasing self-motivation at work

In a business context, self-motivation is essential for a number of reasons.

First and foremost, self-motivated individuals are more likely to take ownership of their work and take initiative to complete tasks and projects. This is especially important in a leadership role, where motivating yourself and others is the key to success.

Self-motivated employees are also more likely to solve problems in a proactive way, which can help a team or company be more efficient and productive as a whole.

How can we increase self-motivation?

But how can we increase our own self-motivation? Here are a few tips:

  1. Set clear and achievable goals. Having a clear idea of what we want to accomplish can help us focus our efforts and give us a sense of purpose. Make sure to set specific and measurable goals that are realistic and achievable within a reasonable timeframe.
  2. Find your motivation. Take the time to understand what drives you and use it to your advantage. Whether it’s a sense of accomplishment, the desire to succeed or the opportunity to make a difference, finding your own personal motivation can help fuel your self-motivation.
  3. Get organised. Being organised can help reduce stress and improve efficiency, which can in turn boost your motivation. Consider implementing time management techniques or using tools like to-do lists and calendars to help keep you on track.
  4. Seek out new challenges. Pushing ourselves to try new things and take on new challenges can help to keep us engaged and motivated. Seek out opportunities to learn and grow, and don’t be afraid to take on tasks that may be outside of your comfort zone.
  5. Surround yourself with motivated individuals. The people we surround ourselves with can have a big impact on our own motivation levels. Seek out individuals who are self-motivated and driven, and consider joining a group or community where you can share ideas and support one another.

The key takeaways

Self-motivation is a crucial trait for anyone looking to succeed in the business world. By setting clear goals, finding your motivation, getting organised, seeking out new challenges, and surrounding yourself with motivated individuals, you can increase your own self-motivation and achieve your goals.

Self-motivation is an ongoing process, so it’s important to check in with yourself often and make changes as needed. 

How to invest in your teams with EQ training

It is obvious why having technical and business skills is crucial in today’s modern workplace. For instance, both of these qualities are necessary for roles in sales and marketing, IT, human resources, and finance. However, emotional intelligence is frequently a quality that is disregarded.

Our capacity to recognise and manage our own emotional states while also being aware of the emotional states of those around us is known as emotional intelligence (EQ). It all comes down to awareness!

Unfortunately, not every worker is adept at handling emotions. The good news is that emotional intelligence is something that can be taught!

Introduction

Emotional intelligence is something companies look for when hiring new employees. Many companies are also investing in and teaching emotional intelligence to help their existing employees grow.

In this session, we will explore why emotional intelligence training is vital to company success and the major benefits of investing in EQ training for your employees. We’ll also explore how to get buy-in from stakeholders and some of the challenges to convincing people of the value of this training.

Finally, we’ll provide some ideas for conducting EQ training, discuss the use of EQ assessments, and provide some links to tools and resources to get you started.

Why is EQ training good for employees?

Emotional intelligence training for employees builds the necessary skills to succeed in business. This type of training program should focus on awareness, control, social, and relationship skills. Some people have natural emotional intelligence, but most need help. Emotional intelligence training is vital to any company’s L&D strategy.

Business benefits of emotional intelligence training

Emotional intelligence predicts job performance from leaders to frontline workers (particularly in jobs with high levels of interpersonal contact). It boosts job satisfaction and reduces burnout. Emotional intelligence improves collaboration and relationships (either between management and employees or between colleagues). As workplace diversity rises, it’s crucial.

Employees and managers should learn to manage their own and others’ emotions. Emotionally intelligent employees will ensure the organisation operates effectively, and efficiently, and follows standards. However, sometimes it takes a bit of convincing for managers and employees to embrace emotional intelligence training.

One of the best ways is to state some of the major business benefits of emotional intelligence training:

Reduces stress

High-EQ employees can manage their reactions to others’ emotions, recognise and control their own negative feelings, take responsibility for their reactions, and manage their expectations. Emotional intelligence training helps teams work under stress.

Assists staff to advance to the next level

Emotional intelligence training helps employees develop leadership and character skills. That means staying calm under pressure, being considerate of irate customers and employees, and approaching problems methodically. A team member who has reached their peak can become a leader with the right training.

Assists employees in overcoming their fears, apprehensions, and insecurities

Have you ever had the impression that some members of your team had trouble moving past setbacks or disappointments? If so, employing emotional intelligence training can give them the skills they need to become more resilient and advance in a positive manner.

Teaches staff how to react to constructive criticism

Your team will avoid acting and speaking defensively with emotional intelligence training. They’ll recognise and be able to control negative emotions.

Enhances communication skills

Instead of expressing their (usually negative) emotions, your team will learn to recognise them, take responsibility for them, and communicate what they need.

Increases tolerance for frustration

Emotional intelligence training helps employees deal with frustrations. This results in better employee interactions and customer service.

Improves social skills

During the pandemic and more recently, employees spent less time talking to each other because there were more teams that worked from home. With the workforce spread out around the world and fewer face-to-face meetings, that can hurt employees’ ability to get along with other people. With training in emotional intelligence, teams will have some tools to help them get along in social situations.

Teaches staff how to spot potential risks to their mental health

Emotional intelligence at work is not just something that employees need to learn. It should also be required of those in charge. These courses can teach leaders how to spot signs that an employee or even an entire team is having trouble, such as negative emotions, poor coping skills, and other signs.

Fosters a positive environment

During emotional intelligence training, one of the things people learn is how to be aware. In particular, they learn that if they don’t control their emotions, they can hurt other people. Also, they will learn to recognise times when they can be good role models.

Shows staff their limitations

Emotional intelligence training doesn’t eliminate negative emotions. It provides tools and techniques for coping. This training helps employees recognise their feelings and limits. Then they can plan their interactions and activities with others.

Assists staff in adjusting to change and uncertainty

If employees have been properly trained, they can accept change, figure out the best way to respond to it, and make changes that are good for the business.

Enhances sense of responsibility

High-EQ employees can own their mistakes. When they fail, they can control their emotions and focus on problem-solving.

Improves leadership

Team managers can draw intelligent conclusions when they use EQ to understand employee emotions and responses. They can identify each team member’s motivators and demotivators. This helps identify ways to boost employee engagement and productivity.

Increases team or group cohesion

By fostering a sense of empathy among team members and ensuring that they are aware of each other’s issues, emotional intelligence training can provide teams with the foundation they need to work together productively. It enables the team to give collaboration and communication top priority.

Enhances customer service

An employee who has received EQ training will be able to: identify and manage their own negative emotions; demonstrate empathy for the customer; work towards a solution without letting their emotions get in the way; and cultivate intelligence over emotions. Even the ability to turn negative interactions into positive ones can be learned with the help of emotional intelligence.

Building your emotional intelligence training program

So, now you know why emotional intelligence training is vital to company success and the major benefits of investing in EQ training for your employees. We’ve also explored how to get buy-in from stakeholders and some of the challenges to convincing people of the value of this training.

In this section, we’ll provide some ideas for conducting EQ training, discuss the use of EQ assessments, and provide some links to resources to get you started.

Use blended learning

Blended learning is the most effective method for emotional intelligence training. During classroom instruction, participants can act out role plays, have discussions, and interpret scenarios using feedback. Participants will comprehend the material better if the learning materials that were covered in person are reinforced online using a learning management system (LMS). You ought to be able to track training metrics for live webinars and in-person training sessions in addition to the efficiency of online training with the appropriate LMS. You must include emotional intelligence training in your training schedule, which should be carried out and completed every three months.

Include tests and quizzes

Learners can better understand a lesson’s key concepts by using online tests and quizzes. Additionally, it keeps students more engaged and enhances the training course experience for their training program. When creating online tests and quizzes, trainers frequently use a variety of question types, including multiple-choice, true or false, and matching tests. As a result, the course is more engaging, and the subject matter doesn’t get too dry.

Try It Out in Real Life

After the training is over, having your students practice in their regular environments is a simple way to get them to use their EQ skills.

Useful resources and links

Psychology Today

146 questions • free

It takes about 45 minutes to complete.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/tests/personality/emotional-intelligence-test

Mind Tools

15 questions • free

Take Mind Tools Quiz

Institute for Health and Human Potential

17 questions • free

Take the IHHP Quiz

The key takeaways

Emotional intelligence is something companies look for when hiring new employees. Many companies are also investing in and teaching emotional intelligence to help their existing employees grow.

This training should focus on awareness, control, social, and relationship skills. It’s vital to any company’s L&D strategy.

Emotional intelligence training helps employees develop leadership and character skills.

A team member who has reached their peak can become a leader with the right training.

Training should also be required of those in charge, so leaders can spot signs that an employee or entire team is having trouble.

High-EQ employees can own their mistakes and focus on problem-solving.

Team managers can draw intelligent conclusions when they use EQ to understand employee emotions.

The ability to turn negative interactions into positive ones can be learned with the help of emotional intelligence training for employees.

You must include emotional intelligence training in your training schedule, which should be carried out every three months.

Participants can better understand a lesson’s key concepts by using online tests and quizzes.

You ought to be able to track training metrics for live webinars and in-person training sessions.

What is democratic leadership?

Introduction

A participatory (or democratic) leader encourages group discussion and decision-making. Participatory methods encourage collaboration and allow group members to contribute to decision-making.

Participative leadership gives team members ownership over an organisation’s goals and plans.

What are the pros and cons of democratic leadership?

Under this leadership, group members may feel valued, aligned, and linked. Their combined knowledge and drive shape their daily jobs and team success, so they must trust and know each other better.

The disadvantages of democratic leadership are that resentment may creep in. Collaborative decision-making is time-consuming. Team members can lose trust. There can be lulls where there is limited productivity. The team’s expertise may be insufficient.

How do you implement democratic leadership?

Democratic leadership makes sense in theory, but how do you implement it?

If group members are inexperienced with this method, leaders must develop the skills to lead and facilitate discussion.

Follow these steps to boost team participation:

Lead discussions: without a flexible leader, free communication and conversations might wander off track. Help your team brainstorm issues, solutions, and how to reach conclusions together. If the conversation veers off-topic, gently bring it back.

Deliver accurate data: leaders have a lot of power since they supply accurate data for group decisions. It’s vital to be as transparent and open as possible. This will increase teamwork and build trust.

Encourage sharing by helping team members share their opinions. A strong team has members with the expertise and perspective needed to make good decisions and find answers.

Summarise progress: note the group’s key thoughts and decisions or solutions. All team members should see this summary.

Encourage decisiveness: assist your team in reaching an agreement and ending a discussion. If they’re hesitant to make decisions, they may need to be pushed. Help them make a decision based on the information.

Take action: when a choice creates a new strategy or project, help the team break it down into tasks. Distribute each assignment or project area to the right team members so they can start acting by the deadline.

The key takeaways

Democratic leadership gives team members ownership over an organisation’s goals and plans.

Participatory methods encourage collaboration and allow group members to contribute to decision-making.

Leaders must develop the skills to lead and facilitate discussion.

Leaders must also supply accurate data for group decisions. This will increase teamwork and build trust.

What is Autocratic Leadership?

Introduction

Autocratic leadership is a management style in which one person has complete authority.

These leaders create a highly regulated workplace. They make all decisions independently, decide on workplace methods and processes, and accept full responsibility for an initiative’s success or failure.

It may not come as a surprise, but this is no longer a popular leadership style. Still, there are times when this style is most applicable and appropriate.

What are the strengths and weaknesses of autocratic leadership?

The autocratic method has both positive and negative aspects.

It is a strength because it establishes clear expectations, promotes order and structure, and allows for quick decision-making.

As a weakness, it can lower morale, impair creativity, and lead to a dependency culture in which success is entirely dependent on one’s own abilities.

When to use autocratic leadership

While those who rely on this approach too heavily are often seen as bossy or dictatorial, this level of control can have benefits and be useful in certain situations.

This management style is effective when the work requires precise instructions and very little deviation from established procedures, or when one person has the experience and knowledge to manage most situations quickly and efficiently.

Because of the risks, only use an autocratic approach if:

A competent leader is in charge. Work involves routine processes and established methods.

People who use an autocratic style are decisive and do not tolerate questions, discussions, or deviations from established policies and procedures.

Teams require clear direction. Some teams may have a difficult time getting organised, setting deadlines, and staying on target. They may need a great deal of direction in carrying out their responsibilities.

An autocratic leader has a “my way or the highway” attitude and leaves little room for creativity or the expression of individual initiative.

You’re facing a crisis. With one person calling the shots, it’s easier to act quickly and get people moving in a crisis. Rather than needing to deliberate, consult, and agree, one person will streamline the process.

On the other hand, a single leader makes it more difficult to replace that person, and there is little opportunity for development or growth as others wait in line to take over.

You require consistency and precision. When consistency and precision are required for success, there is little room for independent thought.

Numerous places of employment stand to gain from the application of autocratic leadership in the right circumstances. Don’t forget to treat your subordinates with respect, share company policies with your team before enforcing them, and do what you can to ensure they feel heard. After that, you will be able to keep control in a sustainable manner by using the autocratic style to your advantage.

The key takeaways

Autocratic leadership is a management style in which one person has complete authority over all workplace decisions. This can be both a strength and a weakness because it establishes clear expectations and promotes order and structure.

It can also lead to a dependency culture in which success is entirely dependent on one’s own abilities.

People who use an autocratic style are decisive and do not tolerate questions, discussions, or deviations from established policies and procedures.

An autocratic leader has a “my way or the highway” attitude and leaves little room for creativity or the expression of individual initiative in the workplace.

What is laissez-faire leadership?

Introduction

Laissez-faire leadership is one of the most popular styles of leadership in modern business today. It’s also known as “passive,” “inert,” or “reactive” because it lets employees do what they want to do with little guidance from management. This type of leadership isn’t always bad—it can be beneficial if used properly!

What is laissez-faire leadership?

Laissez-faire leadership is a style of management that allows employees to do as they please. This hands-off approach to leadership is often used in small businesses or startups, as it’s easier for managers to keep tabs on their teams when they’re not responsible for every decision.

It can also be found in large companies with highly specialised roles—for example, if you work at Yelp and your job involves taking photos at restaurants so that reviewers can provide more accurate feedback on the quality of food and service, then laissez-faire leadership may be right for you!

But how do you know if it’s right for your team? In this article, we’ll discuss the pros and cons of laissez-faire leadership and how to know whether or not it’s the right style for your company.

Types of laissez-faire leadership

Laissez-faire leadership is a style of leadership that focuses on the team and not the leader. It is most often associated with libertarianism but can also be found in other philosophies, such as anarchism and socialism. In this type of leadership, you have to let your employees take charge because they know their jobs best.

Laissez-faire leaders do not set goals for their teams or give them clear instructions on how to perform their jobs effectively; instead, they encourage creativity from employees by giving them leeway in deciding what needs to be done first or last (depending on your company’s culture).

While this may seem like a great way to get your employees to take ownership of their jobs, it can also be problematic because they could make poor decisions that negatively affect the team’s productivity. Laissez-faire leadership is best used in situations where you have highly skilled employees who know what they’re doing. If you’re a startup company with no experience in how to manage people, then this type of leadership probably isn’t for you just yet.

Advantages and disadvantages of laissez-faire leadership

Laissez-faire leadership is an effective style of leadership in fast-paced environments, but it can also be ineffective in slow-moving environments. It’s not as effective when employees are constantly changing roles and responsibilities. In addition, laissez-faire leaders may find themselves challenged by high employee turnover rates—especially if they don’t have the same level of knowledge about their employees’ jobs as their subordinates do.

This means that some employees may not care about doing their jobs as well as others do; this will have an effect on productivity levels across the board and could ultimately lead to lower profits for companies employing this method of management.

Laissez-faire leadership may also be ineffective when there’s a lack of direction from the top.

When employees are left to their own devices, they may make decisions that do not align with the overall goals of the company—or at least not in ways that help boost profits.

The key takeaways

Laissez-faire leadership is not a style of leadership. It’s an approach to leadership that focuses on making decisions without interference or direction from others.

Instead of trying to control everything, leaders who follow this approach let things unfold organically—that is, without the leader imposing their will on things.

The goal is for everyone involved in the business or project to have as much freedom as possible so that they can do their jobs effectively and efficiently.

The only thing that leaders should focus on is making sure that everyone’s goals are aligned and that they have everything they need to be successful.

If you’re looking for a way to build a strong team and create an environment where people can grow, then laissez-faire leadership may be right for you.

5 leadership styles to boost performance

Introduction

What’s the difference between a manager and a leader? In most cases, the answer is simple: leadership skills.

A great manager can adapt to their team’s needs, utilise different styles to boost performance, and be an effective communicator with employees.

The value of a great manager is that they can adapt to their team’s needs and utilise different styles to boost performance.

The five styles of leadership are laissez-faire, autocratic, democratic, transactional, and transformational.

How does each leadership style boost performance?

Laissez-faire is a hands-off approach that is most effective when leading an intelligent and organised group of self-starters.

Under this leadership style, the manager simply lets the team get on with their work without interfering with their work or supervising their progress at all.

Autocratic is an authoritative approach that works best if there’s a tight deadline or a team requires strict supervision.

Decision-making power is held by a single leader, who makes every decision and announces them as orders to be followed.

Democratic: a shared style that encourages equal input. This style is most useful when you need to gather additional perspectives before making a final decision.

To encourage participation, a leader offers all options available, solicits opinions and feedback from team members and stakeholders, and evaluates options.

Transactional: a carrot-and-stick approach that works well when maintaining the status quo and completing a series of short-term tasks.

When executing transactional leadership, leaders may give orders and expect compliance.

When managers need employees to do routine work, transactional leadership works well.

Transformational: an emotionally-driven method where leaders act as visionaries.

This style excels when you need to encourage productivity, innovation, and team engagement.

Conclusion

So, which of these leadership styles is right for you? It depends on your team, goals, and situation. The key is to know yourself as a leader and to be able to adapt as necessary.

The key takeaways

The five styles of leadership are laissez-faire, autocratic, democratic, transactional, and transformational.

A great manager can adapt to their team’s needs and utilise different styles to boost performance.

The key is to know yourself as a leader and to be able to adapt as necessary.

6 practices to become a better leader

Introduction

You need more than just a skill set to become a good leader. No matter how many leadership books you read or how much training you receive, it won’t all “sink in” unless you’re committed to improving your leadership abilities, and that’s where the leadership practices come in.

6 practices to become a better leader

By using these six leadership practices (make decisions, think, make things happen, get people involved, listen and help people grow) you can become a better leader and lead a team with ease and confidence.

1. Make decisions

A leader makes decisions. So the person in the role needs to be confident and self-assured to make the right decisions in a timely manner and make them confidently. For example, if you are in a management position and there is a deadline looming for an important project, say a huge presentation for a client in one week, you can’t say, “I am not going to have time to finalise all the details of this project so I will ask someone else or leave it to my team member or an intern to do this for me.” You are the leader; therefore, you have to take control of the situation, put in your full effort to make sure that the project is completed on time and to the quality that is desired, and be ready to take responsibility for the outcome of your decisions.

2. Think

A leader thinks before taking a decision. For example, a leader should take time before deciding upon any course of action that involves other people in the team, as well as consider the importance of getting all the facts before making a decision. Before making a decision, they have to think and plan. The leader must have an objective for what they are trying to achieve by taking this decision. And then they should think of how to achieve it and what impact it will have on the company.

A leader should also understand why a decision is made and not just focus on what the right decision is. But they should also understand what the pros and cons of the decision that they make are.

3. Make things happen!

A leader should not wait to be made the captain of the team; a leader should go out and be that person. The leader must make things happen, identify the problem, and think of how to solve it. They should make sure that the whole team knows what they plan to do and then carry it out. The leader must think of how to improve the plan. The leader should be seen in their team, and the team should see that the leader is doing their job.

The leader should come up with some ideas and initiatives and should implement them. If there is a problem with their team, the leader should take action and not wait for others to take care of it.

4. Get people involved

It is very important for the leader to get their team members involved in some other areas of work. This helps them learn, develop their skills, and gives them the freedom to grow. This also helps develop some ideas and initiatives.

But the leader should be careful not to misuse this opportunity or get too involved, or the team might resent or feel that the leader has hijacked their ideas. On the other hand, it is also essential for the leader to create an atmosphere conducive to learning and development within their team.

5. Listen

A good leader always listens. They do not let their ego get in the way of listening to people. The leader should ask questions, listen carefully to what people have to say, and then respond to their points. It is very important for the leader to listen to people to understand how they perceive the problems, what they think of the solutions, what they need, and what the impacts of their decisions will be.

6. Help people grow

A leader should help people grow. It helps them to develop their skills, make them feel needed, improve their productivity, and make them feel valued. Leaders need to get out of their comfort zones and not sit behind their desks and watch their people grow. As leaders, we all are different. Each of us has our own skill set. We are also different in personality. So we need to build a culture where people can be free to bring out the best in themselves.

The key takeaways

You need more than just a skill set to become a good leader. No matter how many leadership books you read or how much training you receive, it won’t all “sink in” unless you’re committed to improving your leadership abilities. By using these six leadership practices, you can become a better leader and lead a team with ease and confidence. The leader must make things happen, identify the problem, and think of how to solve it. It is very important for the leader to get their team members involved in some other areas of work. This helps them learn, develop their skills, and gives them the freedom to grow. A good leader always listens and does not let their ego get in the way of listening to people.

Engaging and motivating employees

Introduction

The work that engaged employees do is personally important to them. They take pride in what they do and are committed to the long-term expansion and prosperity of the business. Employee engagement and enhanced key performance outcomes are correlated. These results include everything from higher productivity and customer satisfaction rates to lower employee turnover and absenteeism rates. As a leader, you have a big responsibility to make sure that your team members are engaged and motivated.

What Is employee engagement?

The level of commitment that employees have to the company and its success is known as employee engagement. It also includes how driven they are to finish their work, how much they identify with the company’s values, and how willing they are to cooperate and work as a team.

Why is employee engagement important?

Engagement among employees is crucial for a variety of reasons.

First, there is a direct correlation between employee satisfaction and engagement. If your team members are unhappy with their jobs, it will undoubtedly show in their work as they won’t feel motivated. Employee productivity is low when they aren’t performing well due to a lack of motivation.

Secondly, higher employee engagement is associated with higher profitability, lower turnover, better quality and customer service, higher work productivity, greater loyalty to the organisation, and even less employee sick time.

Thirdly, employee engagement has a very real impact on business success, and employee engagement (and ensuring you keep good employees happy) should be considered a part of a business strategy.

How do you keep employees engaged and motivated?

As a leader, you have a significant impact on motivating and energising employees. Check whether you are offering the conditions necessary for employees to feel engaged at work by considering the following:

  • Does everyone understand how their work fits in with the broader organisational strategy, where they are in relation to the progress of that strategy, and what they must do to further progress?
  • Do workers feel valued and competent in their positions? Do they receive sufficient training, and do you emphasise their strengths rather than their weaknesses?
  • Do workers feel that their suggestions are welcomed, taken seriously, and encouraged?
  • Is there a productive, wholesome, and positive work environment? Are there any concerns about punishment or judgement?
  • Are there opportunities for employees to be challenged, learn new skills, or assume roles of authority?
  • As a leader, do you behave honourably, with respect, and with goodwill? Do you exhibit strong emotional intelligence and transparency, and are your actions and words consistent?

Encourage your staff to be authentic. When managers demand that their team members behave in certain ways or be motivated by the same things, they run the risk of unintentionally inciting conflict and resentment. Reward staff members for being unique. Pay more attention to the activities that they are engaging in and less to those that they aren’t, as these activities may be a better fit with their personality and interests. Encourage employees to be true to who they are, and then use their natural talents to produce the results they want.

The key takeaways

As a leader, you have a big responsibility to make sure that your team members are engaged and motivated. Employee engagement and enhanced key performance outcomes are correlated. These include everything from higher productivity and customer satisfaction rates to lower employee turnover and absenteeism rates. Check whether you are offering the conditions necessary for employees to feel engaged at work.

What is leadership, and what makes a good leader?

Introduction

Despite the misconception that leadership means delivering commands to those around you, it actually serves as a source of empowerment for others to succeed for both the business and themselves. Making judgments that benefit the organisation as a whole or its objectives rather than just one individual is another aspect of it.

Many people associate leadership with positions of power, wealth, and notoriety. Leadership, however, is not a real position or title. In reality, it has to do with your behaviour and the example you create for others.

What is leadership?

Having the power to influence others is what it means to be a leader. Leadership entails motivating others to fulfil certain objectives, whether you are in charge of a family, a team, or a company. You have the choice of active or passive leadership, as well as whether to prioritise involvement or merely output. It’s important to help others grow when leading.

Successful leadership paves the way for followers to follow. It sets a direction, creates a vision, and makes adjustments as needed. Finding the areas where your team or organisation needs to “win” is the essence of leadership. It’s vibrant, thrilling, and motivating.

As previously mentioned, leadership involves developing and communicating a vision as well as inspiring people to strive towards that vision. However, it’s possible that leaders lack the expertise or involvement in day-to-day work management required to make the vision a reality.

What is the difference between a leader and a manager?

Management and leadership are not the same things. Do you have P&L duties and 15 employees under your downline? Congratulations! I hope you make a good manager. Effective management is necessary. In addition to many other tasks, managers must plan, measure, monitor, coordinate, resolve, hire, and fire employees. Managers typically control things. Managers lead people.

What about titles and leadership?

Titles have no bearing on leadership.

Similar to the previous statement, merely holding a C-rank title does not entitle you to the title of “leader”. You don’t need a title to lead. In actuality, you don’t need a title to be a leader in your place of worship, your community, or your family.

One of Donald McGannon’s well-known quotations is, “Leadership is action, not position.”

Leadership is about the actions we decide to take, not about the part we play in the organisation. Everything is dependent on decisions and actions. You can be a leader without a title; it just takes a leadership mentality, regardless of your position in the organisation. It is obvious if a leader regards their position as “simply a job.”

You need the correct motivation if you want to lead effectively. Do you genuinely want to motivate people to be their best, or are you more concerned with money and status?

The key takeaways

Many people associate leadership with positions of power, wealth, and notoriety. Leadership, however, is not a real position or title. It has to do with your behaviour and the example you create for others.

Leadership is developing and communicating a vision as well as inspiring people to strive towards that vision.

One of Donald McGannon’s well-known quotations is, “Leadership is action, not position.”

Managers typically control things. Leaders lack the expertise or involvement in day-to-day management required to make the vision a reality.

You don’t need a title to be a leader, regardless of your position in the organisation.

Common Causes of Conflict in the Workplace

The key to a harmonious workplace is the common goal of a job well done. However, in the real world, there are a host of common sources that can lead to conflict.

This is especially true when teams are brought together from different companies, or individuals from different departments. Conflict can also arise because of personality differences, and even when everyone is on the same page.

To be successful in the workplace, you need to be able to recognise conflict situations and avoid them, as well as be able to work through them constructively if they arise. A healthy conflict resolution process is the cornerstone of a happy, productive workplace.

If you have ever worked at a company where people had some trouble getting along, you know that workplace conflict is one of the leading causes of loss of productivity. It can also lead to negative attitudes and poor customer service, both of which are critical to running a business.

Here are some of the common causes of workplace conflict:

Incompatibility

Even though you may have very similar backgrounds and work with a large number of people, you may not have a lot in common. This may be because of differences in personality, values, or philosophy, or differences in how people were raised.

It’s not only a problem for teams from different companies that can have a difficult time getting along.

People often have difficulty when they interact with people who are different from themselves, and this can cause friction even when both parties are working on a team project together.

Conflict can also result from personality differences between management and hourly employees. For example, if your boss is outgoing and social, you are more reserved and reserved, whereas if your manager is quiet and not social, you can be talkative and outgoing.

Sometimes, these differences can be worked through, but they also may cause people to be suspicious of each other and not get along.

The best way to avoid this type of conflict is to be aware of your own personality and values, and be careful in choosing who you work with. Be open to learning about the personality and values of other people in the company and take advantage of opportunities to improve communication between you and others.

Dysfunction

Friction can also arise from the people in the company who have dysfunction in their lives. Sometimes a dysfunctional person will be a part of a team, and when he or she is on the team, the dysfunction can spill over into conflict.

Dysfunction in the workplace can come from a variety of sources. For example, if you work for a boss who is emotionally distant or a coworker who is addicted to drugs or alcohol.

Often, dysfunction is not readily apparent to people, but it is still there, and that makes it difficult to get along. If you notice someone who is becoming increasingly difficult to work with, you need to speak up and deal with it early on. You will avoid a lot of frustration and wasted time.

Poor Performance

When people perform poorly at work, it is especially likely that there will be conflict. If you are a part of a team that has problems, you might be tempted to give up and not contribute, but you should hold out for the day when you will be able to have a good team.

Sometimes, people get assigned to a team that is a group of people who are not good at their job. When people perform poorly and don’t do their jobs properly, it is extremely frustrating and can lead to conflict.

If you are on a team that is having problems, it is best to work on finding a way to move to a team that is working well.

Poor Job Performance

Even when a team performs well at work, there are always occasional people who perform poorly. As a leader, you need to be able to deal with people who perform poorly. There is nothing that can replace the importance of a good manager.

Although it may seem easier to blame someone else for the team’s problems, this is rarely the case.

No one is perfect. Even if there is a person on the team who is not doing their job correctly, the team will be able to make a change.

It is difficult to be a leader who has to constantly clean up after people who are not doing their job correctly. There is no reason to make the people who are responsible for the mess feel bad about themselves or feel as though they are doing something wrong.

If you see someone who is not doing their job correctly, you need to bring it to their attention. While you might be tempted to look for someone else to blame for the problem, this is not the way to handle it.

Team Friction

Even though you may be a part of a team that is good at performing their work, sometimes it can be difficult to maintain a smooth team. There are many reasons for this.

If the team is working together, but there is no team spirit, it can be difficult to get along. When team spirit is missing, people will be unhappy, which can lead to conflict.

The team needs to work together in the same direction, and this can be difficult when there are different ideas about what should be done, or different styles of dealing with problems. You need to have an open dialogue about these issues so that they can be resolved.

The main goal is to make sure that the team is working together to achieve a common goal. Even though you can be a part of a team, you need to still focus on getting the job done.

Poor Communication

One of the major causes of workplace conflict is poor communication. In the real world, conflict is inevitable because people communicate in different ways.

For example, some people speak at a rapid-fire pace, and they do not use a lot of “ums” and “ahs.” Other people speak very slowly, and use words like “you know,” and “I mean,” which make them sound as if they are getting a lot of words out.

People who talk at different speeds can have difficulty understanding each other, and misunderstand what is being said. This type of problem leads to frustration, and will also affect how the team works together.

You can be part of a team that is working well, and still have issues with poor communication. In some cases, poor communication is a sign that there is a lack of trust. People are not willing to speak up when they have issues, so they try to get through a problem without telling anyone.

Even if you have good communication skills, it is important that you make an effort to learn about the communication style of the people in the company. You can do this through observation, asking, or by getting advice from someone who knows both of you.

Lack of Focus

When people are not focused on the task at hand, and are busy doing a number of different things, it is very difficult to maintain a proper focus.

When you are working on a project that is important to you, it is crucial to be able to concentrate and maintain focus. It is very difficult to work on a project when you are distracted by something else.

People who are unfocused will work on a project or will start a project, and then switch their attention to something else. This can mean that the team starts working on a project that is not important, or there can be someone who is not focusing on the project.

If you are a leader in the workplace, you need to make sure that you are focused on the things that are most important. In the beginning of a project, it is critical that you stay focused on the main point. It is not a good time to start off by taking shortcuts, or you will be setting the team up for problems down the road.

The only way to be successful in the workplace is to keep focused on what needs to be done.

Incompetent Leadership

Another cause of workplace conflict is when the people in the company are not getting what they need from their leaders. When this happens, it can cause tension in the workplace.

Incompetent leadership can cause frustration and anger. People who are not getting what they need may feel as though they are not getting anywhere in the company.

Incompetent leaders are also more likely to take shortcuts, and they will not be able to provide the support and guidance that is needed to move the team forward.

You can’t force people to become more competent, but you do need to learn how to lead in a way that helps to get the best results out of the team.

If you have been working at a company that has incompetent leaders, it may be hard to see how the leader is a part of the problem. You have to look at the results to see who is responsible for the problem.

Leadership is a process, and you can’t teach it overnight. If you have been working at a company where people are unhappy and are having problems, you need to be able to recognise when the leadership needs to change.

The key takeaways

  • Understanding what causes conflict in the workplace is the first step to prevent it from happening to your team. Conflict can stem from miscommunication. Tensions may arise when team members have clashing personalities, work styles, needs, interests, or values.
  • Also, ambiguous work roles, expectations, and procedures can leave room for arguments— and unmanaged performance issues can create resentment for the rest of the team.
  • Do your best to get ahead of conflict and equip your team with the tools and environment they need to effectively navigate or avoid these situations. Or, if you notice the signs of team conflict, diagnose the problem first before deciding on the best way to fix it.
  • Don’t ignore conflict or allow it to fester. Instead, address conflict promptly and directly.
  • Encourage your team to confront conflict and develop strategies to deal with it effectively.
  • Allow people to express issues if they have them.

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