How to invest in your teams with EQ training

It is obvious why having technical and business skills is crucial in today’s modern workplace. For instance, both of these qualities are necessary for roles in sales and marketing, IT, human resources, and finance. However, emotional intelligence is frequently a quality that is disregarded.

Our capacity to recognise and manage our own emotional states while also being aware of the emotional states of those around us is known as emotional intelligence (EQ). It all comes down to awareness!

Unfortunately, not every worker is adept at handling emotions. The good news is that emotional intelligence is something that can be taught!

Introduction

Emotional intelligence is something companies look for when hiring new employees. Many companies are also investing in and teaching emotional intelligence to help their existing employees grow.

In this session, we will explore why emotional intelligence training is vital to company success and the major benefits of investing in EQ training for your employees. We’ll also explore how to get buy-in from stakeholders and some of the challenges to convincing people of the value of this training.

Finally, we’ll provide some ideas for conducting EQ training, discuss the use of EQ assessments, and provide some links to tools and resources to get you started.

Why is EQ training good for employees?

Emotional intelligence training for employees builds the necessary skills to succeed in business. This type of training program should focus on awareness, control, social, and relationship skills. Some people have natural emotional intelligence, but most need help. Emotional intelligence training is vital to any company’s L&D strategy.

Business benefits of emotional intelligence training

Emotional intelligence predicts job performance from leaders to frontline workers (particularly in jobs with high levels of interpersonal contact). It boosts job satisfaction and reduces burnout. Emotional intelligence improves collaboration and relationships (either between management and employees or between colleagues). As workplace diversity rises, it’s crucial.

Employees and managers should learn to manage their own and others’ emotions. Emotionally intelligent employees will ensure the organisation operates effectively, and efficiently, and follows standards. However, sometimes it takes a bit of convincing for managers and employees to embrace emotional intelligence training.

One of the best ways is to state some of the major business benefits of emotional intelligence training:

Reduces stress

High-EQ employees can manage their reactions to others’ emotions, recognise and control their own negative feelings, take responsibility for their reactions, and manage their expectations. Emotional intelligence training helps teams work under stress.

Assists staff to advance to the next level

Emotional intelligence training helps employees develop leadership and character skills. That means staying calm under pressure, being considerate of irate customers and employees, and approaching problems methodically. A team member who has reached their peak can become a leader with the right training.

Assists employees in overcoming their fears, apprehensions, and insecurities

Have you ever had the impression that some members of your team had trouble moving past setbacks or disappointments? If so, employing emotional intelligence training can give them the skills they need to become more resilient and advance in a positive manner.

Teaches staff how to react to constructive criticism

Your team will avoid acting and speaking defensively with emotional intelligence training. They’ll recognise and be able to control negative emotions.

Enhances communication skills

Instead of expressing their (usually negative) emotions, your team will learn to recognise them, take responsibility for them, and communicate what they need.

Increases tolerance for frustration

Emotional intelligence training helps employees deal with frustrations. This results in better employee interactions and customer service.

Improves social skills

During the pandemic and more recently, employees spent less time talking to each other because there were more teams that worked from home. With the workforce spread out around the world and fewer face-to-face meetings, that can hurt employees’ ability to get along with other people. With training in emotional intelligence, teams will have some tools to help them get along in social situations.

Teaches staff how to spot potential risks to their mental health

Emotional intelligence at work is not just something that employees need to learn. It should also be required of those in charge. These courses can teach leaders how to spot signs that an employee or even an entire team is having trouble, such as negative emotions, poor coping skills, and other signs.

Fosters a positive environment

During emotional intelligence training, one of the things people learn is how to be aware. In particular, they learn that if they don’t control their emotions, they can hurt other people. Also, they will learn to recognise times when they can be good role models.

Shows staff their limitations

Emotional intelligence training doesn’t eliminate negative emotions. It provides tools and techniques for coping. This training helps employees recognise their feelings and limits. Then they can plan their interactions and activities with others.

Assists staff in adjusting to change and uncertainty

If employees have been properly trained, they can accept change, figure out the best way to respond to it, and make changes that are good for the business.

Enhances sense of responsibility

High-EQ employees can own their mistakes. When they fail, they can control their emotions and focus on problem-solving.

Improves leadership

Team managers can draw intelligent conclusions when they use EQ to understand employee emotions and responses. They can identify each team member’s motivators and demotivators. This helps identify ways to boost employee engagement and productivity.

Increases team or group cohesion

By fostering a sense of empathy among team members and ensuring that they are aware of each other’s issues, emotional intelligence training can provide teams with the foundation they need to work together productively. It enables the team to give collaboration and communication top priority.

Enhances customer service

An employee who has received EQ training will be able to: identify and manage their own negative emotions; demonstrate empathy for the customer; work towards a solution without letting their emotions get in the way; and cultivate intelligence over emotions. Even the ability to turn negative interactions into positive ones can be learned with the help of emotional intelligence.

Building your emotional intelligence training program

So, now you know why emotional intelligence training is vital to company success and the major benefits of investing in EQ training for your employees. We’ve also explored how to get buy-in from stakeholders and some of the challenges to convincing people of the value of this training.

In this section, we’ll provide some ideas for conducting EQ training, discuss the use of EQ assessments, and provide some links to resources to get you started.

Use blended learning

Blended learning is the most effective method for emotional intelligence training. During classroom instruction, participants can act out role plays, have discussions, and interpret scenarios using feedback. Participants will comprehend the material better if the learning materials that were covered in person are reinforced online using a learning management system (LMS). You ought to be able to track training metrics for live webinars and in-person training sessions in addition to the efficiency of online training with the appropriate LMS. You must include emotional intelligence training in your training schedule, which should be carried out and completed every three months.

Include tests and quizzes

Learners can better understand a lesson’s key concepts by using online tests and quizzes. Additionally, it keeps students more engaged and enhances the training course experience for their training program. When creating online tests and quizzes, trainers frequently use a variety of question types, including multiple-choice, true or false, and matching tests. As a result, the course is more engaging, and the subject matter doesn’t get too dry.

Try It Out in Real Life

After the training is over, having your students practice in their regular environments is a simple way to get them to use their EQ skills.

Useful resources and links

Psychology Today

146 questions • free

It takes about 45 minutes to complete.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/tests/personality/emotional-intelligence-test

Mind Tools

15 questions • free

Take Mind Tools Quiz

Institute for Health and Human Potential

17 questions • free

Take the IHHP Quiz

The key takeaways

Emotional intelligence is something companies look for when hiring new employees. Many companies are also investing in and teaching emotional intelligence to help their existing employees grow.

This training should focus on awareness, control, social, and relationship skills. It’s vital to any company’s L&D strategy.

Emotional intelligence training helps employees develop leadership and character skills.

A team member who has reached their peak can become a leader with the right training.

Training should also be required of those in charge, so leaders can spot signs that an employee or entire team is having trouble.

High-EQ employees can own their mistakes and focus on problem-solving.

Team managers can draw intelligent conclusions when they use EQ to understand employee emotions.

The ability to turn negative interactions into positive ones can be learned with the help of emotional intelligence training for employees.

You must include emotional intelligence training in your training schedule, which should be carried out every three months.

Participants can better understand a lesson’s key concepts by using online tests and quizzes.

You ought to be able to track training metrics for live webinars and in-person training sessions.

Improving your self-awareness

Self-awareness is knowing how external stimuli affect internal reality. Basic mindfulness involves recognising emotions and their effects. Self-aware people can:

  • Identify and label their emotions.
  • Know why they feel a certain way.
  • Learn how emotions affect their behaviour and that of other people.

People who are self-aware have a strong sense of identity; they know who they are and what their goals and interests are.

3 types of self-awareness

There are three types of self-awareness: emotional self-awareness, accurate self-assessment, and self-confidence.

Emotional self-awareness. Being emotionally aware means being aware of how you feel. For example, are you happy, sad, scared, or something else? And being aware of your feelings means knowing how they might affect the way you think, act, and do your job.

Accurate self-assessment. Self-assessment involves knowing your emotional strengths, weaknesses, and limits. For example, you know you may yell when frustrated, angry, or stressed.

Self-confidence. Knowing your emotional tendencies boosts self-confidence. Self-confident people don’t let surprises shake them. They know who they are and can communicate effectively.

The importance of self-awareness

Without self-awareness, we ignore our emotions and become victims. If we don’t acknowledge our emotions, they may control our decisions, influence our actions, and hurt our performance.

With self-awareness, we can stop negative behaviours, cope with stress and emotions, understand our motivations and values, empathise with others, strengthen our relationships, and become more assertive.

5 Tips for Improving Self-Awareness

So, what can you do to become more self-aware? The first step is to listen and ask questions.

Feel and accept your emotions

Emotions give us information, so we shouldn’t try to hide them or hold them in. Instead of trying to fight them, focus on how you feel. Give them names, sit down with them, and let them do what they need to do. Ask yourself, “How do I feel right now?” and “Why did I choose this label?” on a regular basis. When you recognise and accept something, you become aware of it.

Keep a reflective journal

Practice emotional reflection. Keep a journal of your day’s events. What did you do? “Working late today made me angry and bitter.” After getting home, I ignored my family. You’ll notice patterns in a journal. You’ll recognise emotional triggers and responses.

Notice your physical reactions

Our bodies store emotion. Anxiety causes sweaty palms, a fast heartbeat, and tight muscles. By recognising these reactions, you can understand your internal signals before noticing the emotion. Make it a habit to do body scans when you’re relaxed or returning home from a stressful day. Ask yourself, “How are my breathing, heart rate, and muscles? Are they different from normal?”

Reflect with “what” questions

When we reflect on our emotions, we tend to focus on “why” rather than “what.” “Why did I yell at everyone?” we wonder. “Why was I so nervous?” However, when asked “why,” we frequently invent our own answers and place blame. “I have an anger problem,” we say, or “I’m just a nervous person.” Instead, try to figure out what is going on to increase self-awareness. For example, you might ask: “What about the experience made me nervous? What did this situation have in common with previous encounters?”

Seek regular feedback

Sometimes our thoughts and actions clash. Others may perceive your assertiveness as bullying. Ask senior leaders, peers, and subordinates for feedback often. By asking for and accepting feedback, you’ll learn how others see you.

The key takeaways

Self-awareness is knowing how external stimuli affect internal reality. Being emotionally aware means being aware of how you feel and how that might affect the way you think, act, and do your job.

There are three types of self-awareness: emotional self-awareness, accurate self-assessment, and self-confidence.

Ask yourself, “How do I feel right now?” and “Why did I choose this label?” on a regular basis.

Make it a habit to do body scans when you’re relaxed or returning home from a stressful day.

Ask senior leaders, peers, and subordinates for feedback often. By asking for and accepting feedback, you’ll learn how others see you.

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑