Assessing Your Team Culture

The culture of your team is made up of many moving parts, some of which are difficult to describe. Still, culture is important to understand since it reveals how individuals collaborate and how they feel about their work. It also helps to reveal obstacles, which you can then use to guide your next steps.

Begin by taking the proper method to assessing your team’s culture. Take on the role of a neutral spectator, be aware of emotions, and pay attention to what isn’t there just as much as what is. Then, to begin your evaluation, go on a culture walk and take notes on what you observe.

What do you look for when you go on a culture walk around the office?

Culture is more than just the stuff at work. It’s about how people act, the type of workplace space they have, how they work, what equipment they use, and so on.

Culture walks can help you discover characteristics of your organisation that are concealed within the setting of the workplace and can have a detrimental impact on your culture if you are not aware of them. They’re also a terrific method to enlist employees’ help in promoting your company’s culture.

A company’s genuine culture can be revealed through a culture walk.

  • Cultural assumptions that aren’t obvious.
  • Unspoken preconceptions about workers.
  • Cultural beliefs that aren’t widely known.
  • Unspoken management beliefs.
  • Getting employees involved in the culture of the company.

Through the process of discovery, a culture walk can accomplish this. It’s like going on a treasure quest for cultural clues.

The clues are buried in the organisation’s background, and uncovering them will reveal how to promote your culture, and more crucially, how to promote the company.

Conducting group interviews

Conduct group interviews to learn more about what your team members are thinking and how they communicate.

So, get your pen, notebook, and questions ready. Ask of yourself or others about how your culture acts in a certain scenario.

The more questions you ask, the more you reveal about your culture. Let’s have a look at some examples you could ask:

  • What is the purpose of leaving work in the middle of the day?
  • Why is there so much gossip among the staff?
  • What is the purpose of having an office Christmas party?

This is only the start of learning about your culture. To learn more about your culture, ask more questions.

Using anonymous surveys

Use anonymous surveys to uncover any aspects of your workplace culture that you hadn’t considered. This will provide you with a complete picture of what’s going on both in front of and behind the scenes.

If you have an open plan workplace with no personal offices, for example, a clear trend is emerging around your office that reflects who you are and how you function.

If you wish to foster this corporate culture, you can use this information to influence your office design and make it more inviting to employees who prefer a more free-wheeling, flexible work environment.

The goal of assessing your team culture is to motivate you to think about how you may improve your culture and environment to attract new employees and keep current ones. The more you can concentrate on this, the more competitive and successful you will become.

The key takeaways

Culture is more than just the stuff at work. It’s about how people act, the type of workplace space they have, how they work, what equipment they use, and so on.

Culture walks can help you discover characteristics of your organisation that are concealed within the setting of the workplace. The more questions you ask, the more you reveal about your workplace culture. The clues are buried in your organisation’s background, and uncovering them will reveal how to promote your culture.

Conduct group interviews to learn more about what your team members are thinking and how they communicate.

Use anonymous surveys to uncover any aspects of your workplace culture that you hadn’t considered. This will provide you with a complete picture of what’s going on both in front of and behind the scenes.

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